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? and what are the consequences for the economy if there isn't one? we'll ask the president's lead budget negotiator, treasury secretary tim geithner. >>> then the view from capitol hill. are democrats as divided over cutting medicare as republicans are over tax increases? with us, two voices calling for compromise. republican senator bob corker of tennessee and democratic senator claire mccaskill of missouri. >>> finally, our special economic roundtable. as both sides battle over the nation's fiscal health, what can we expect from the economy in a second obama term? what is the vision for an economic rebound? >>> from nbc news in washington, the world's longest-running television program, this is "meet the press" with david gregory. >>> and good sunday morning. amidst a lot of partisan rhetoric on both sides, talks on the fiscal cliff are now at a stand still, and the president is back on the campaign trail of sorts. this time to try to win in a court of public opinion for his plan to avert an automatic tax hike for everyone on january 1. that's where we'll start this morning with the po
hurting our economy and creating jobs. today, the white house has demanded an offer from republicans. they now have one. back to you. llri: rich edson, and he thinks. the market is taking a breather today. dupont and 3m are the biggest draggers on the dow. early stocks rising out of the gate out of some good news out of china over the night. hitting a seven month high, but then the u.s. isf number hit at 10:00 a.m. eastern and a wave of selling. manufacturing activity contracted in november. they say the factory index came in at 49.5 in november. down from almost 52 and october. keep in mind, any number below 50 means contraction. above 50 equals expansion. investors are still worried about tax treatment and dead deals. exelon, the worst of the bunch our first guest has seen it all. the u.s. economy they fall into a recession next year even if congress strikes a budget deal by year end. joining us from stanford, california, martin feldstein. thank you for being with us. the republicans now responding. negotiations well underway to avoid a fiscal cliff. to your point, you recently sai
the economy avoid the cliff and rides above? anyway, senior u.s. economist and managing director at ubs. do you think we'll get a deal? >> i think we'll get a deal. do we get it before the holidays or after for markets, it matters. it's been a drag for the last nine months. so the idea that there is more uncertainty now than there was six months ago, how does that work? there was no fiscal cliff deal six months from now and still no deal. so i'm not sure why we think there's more uncertainty. i would say if you really think about it the president has a lot of ways to delay the impact. for example, our withholding table don't have to get change order january 1. even if you haven't struck a deal, you don't adjust the withholding tables. for now you can delay the pain. so there is wiggle room in terms of when the impact has to be felt. >> but is there where wiggle rom the investing world who looks at the united states and says these guys are a bunch of keystone cops. this cost us with the last round of negotiations back in the summer of 2011 when the debt rating agencies said if you can't find
and reach an agreement that's going to be good for the country and for the economy. >> then what now? with democratic senator mark warner and kelli ayote. benghazi and obama's second term. with montana governor brian schweitzer, and former hewlett-packard ceo carly fiorina. and susan page of usa today. i am candy crowley. and this is "state of the union." republicans call the fiscal cliff plan a joke, an insult and break from reality. suffice it to say, it is unacceptable to them. the president's opening round offer includes $1.6 trillion in new taxes, $400 billion in savings from medicare and other entitlement programs, $50 billion in new stimulus spending, and an additional $285 billion to fund depreciation and mortgage programs, unemployment insurance benefits, and payroll tax cuts. >> this extra spending, that's actually greater than the amount they're willing to cut. i mean, it's -- it was not a serious proposal. >> while his aides were on capitol hill offering up the opening bid, the president was making his case in pennsylvania campaign style. >> at the end of the day a clear
need liken fraught structure. we think that's what is good for the economy. if they have different suggestions and want to go further in some areas, they should lay it out to us. >> you say they are in a hard spot, what do you mean? >> they are trying to figure out how to find a way to support things that they know they are going to have to do that will be very hard for them. you've heard them for the first time in two decades now acknowledge that they are willing to have revenues go up as part of the balanced plan. that's a it good first step but they have to tell us what they are willing to do on rates and revenues. and they have to tell us on the spending side if they want to go beyond where we are or do it differently and they have to tell us what makes sense to them. what we can't do, chris; try to figure out what works for them. >> the president campaigned for re-election on the idea of a, quote, balanced approach, end quote, to deficit reduction. a mixture of tax increases and spending cuts. here's the plan that the republicans say you presented to them this week. >> i can t
and the demand for oil -- actually, and the demand for oil continues to decline based on fuel economy standards and other reasons. and yet, with this revolution we still continue to have a problem. and i think the report that we're releasing today, the national strategy for energy security and its subtitle really says it all -- harnessing american resources innovation. and the first point is, how do we leverage this abundance we have in the united states to our maximum benefit? at a time when washington is talking about our fiscal crisis i'd say that the relationship of our oil needs to this crisis itself are close. it might not solve our fiscal crisis but clearly it's a necessary ingredient. every recession in the history of the united states in moden times has been preceded by or happening concurrent with an oil price spike. if we don't have continued growth we can cut all we want and raise revenue all we want, but we'll never find a way to solve our fiscal troubles. and i think this report really looks at how do we leverage this great abundance, this great blessing in the united states, both
referred to things that will help make the economy stronger in the short-term and let me explain why we proposed that. what we are suggesting is that we work to rebuild the country's infrastructure, rather than putting it off, doesn't say just to put it off and extend unemployment insurance benefits and help make it easier for americans to refinance mortgages and, tax incentives for business investment and proposed how to do that in a fiscally responsible way we can afford to pay for and matched those proposals, with spending savings that, together as part of the plan, get us down to the point where we stabilize our debt and that is the critical test. >> chris: let me drill down into the spending part of the equation, here they're increases, spending increase as you are proposing. $150 billion, in stimulus, public works projects over several years. a $30 billion extension of unemployment insurance, for one year. extension of payroll tax cuts, mortgage relief, deferral, of automatic cuts for doctors and medicare. here are the spending cuts. unspecified savings from nonentitlement program
like republicans want? >> here is what is at stake. economy is on the brink potentially of going to recession. that will have the worst impact on the deficit that anything will. we got to make sure that the economy continuebes to grow. that is the problem here. i know democrats have this blood lust to raise taxes on supposedly rich people, which are really small business people. but it is not going to do anything to grow the economy. here is what president obama needs. he has to make sure the economy grows. he will be a two-term jimmy carter if the economy goes back in recession and we can't pull ourselves out of this thing. >> eric: i heard you laugh, martin on the "two-term jimmy carter" line. >> he doesn't want to be a two-term george w. bush that took us in a steep recession. >> hey, you are the one with the bush tax cut. >> this can be worked out. everybody knows that. you can raise rates a point or two, that is not going to be end of the world. republicans understand that. let's get through with the fear we have had a couple of weeks of theater and let's get down to serious
on the very, very decent and accelerating fundamentals of the u.s. economy. >> maybe, and that's just today, right, ron? >> been since last week. >> we were talking about the market really being so sensitive to any rhetoric out of washington. >> i'm not saying it's not hostage to headlines. we'll get intraday volatility. from the monday before thank giving until now, we have effectively wiped out the losses we saw post-election. >> rick, how do you see it? market complacency, too much angst, are we overthinking this? how do you read the market right now? >> i think that the low volume movements of the equity markets aren't really telling you any information. there's no way even in aggregate a market could decide what's going on in harry reid or john boehner's brain in anything is going on in begin with. if you look at treasuries overlaid on top of equities, until mr. boehner's comments, the treasuries have taken the big picture on all of this. they're not going anywhere fast. fiscal cliff is important, but there's a lot of issues for the next several years that are going to be important to
the kinds of revenue from the wealthiest americans to help the economy grow and achieve deficit reduction and this puts us on a path towards a better economy. >> [inaudible question] what will he do at this moment? >> i would simply redirect that question to the republican leaders, who to this day, have not put forward any proposal on how they would achieve revenues and address the issue on the top 2%. there is no other way to do it, there is no other mathematically sound way to do it. making vague promises about achieving revenue through capping deductions were closing loopholes, it simply doesn't add up to a serious proposal. we haven't heard which deductions they would cap or which loopholes they were close. what is true is that other proposals that have been put forward include attempts to raise revenue only through closing loopholes and limited deductions can only achieve this if the middle class gets stuck with the bill. or if you have a proposal that is wildly limply unfeasible because it suggests that we would wipe out charitable deductions. it is simply impossible and getting som
starting to hurt the economy, do you agree? >> you see that with the investment spending, and it can only get worse as we get closer to the end of the year as everybody holds their breath in the economy collectively, we have big problems. lori: one thing was the incredible amount of government spending especially on defense. one of the biggest issues is concerning. >> the issue really is what happened in the current quarter and going into the beginning of next year. other types of discretionary spending is as well. the total is $600 billion, the economy simply cannot withstand that sort of shock. we saw a week underlining detail report. know the economy will be soft in the current quarter due in part to hurricane sandy but also the slower trends in the various components. lori: 1.7 is the consensus estimate of expansion, what are you thinking? >> we're forecasting 1.3%. in the ballpark of 1.7 before hurricane made landfall. more of a ceiling than a floor at this point. lori: anything good to look forward to? >> things don't look all that bad next year. one of the key reasons when next you
the economy is pretty well positioned potentially in 2013 if we can put this behind us. so i think a lot of what's going on is what you would expect to see in this negotiation, very public negotiation, which is not the best way to do it. i think at some point, the president and the speaker are going to get in a room and have some very serious dialogue as this gets closer. my view is that both the administration and the republicans would prefer to put a deal together, and the outlines of that are on the table. >> you talk about the cliff or the abyss? we need to separate the two. it would be nice to have like a bridge to that $4 trillion deal that includes entitlement, tax reform. in fact, i don't know why the president isn't talking about that more with the simpson-bowles. >> the president did say that he doesn't think there's anything we can get done. >> as a bridge to that. always talking about the high end. >> actually, joe, i think the administration wants to see a deal come together here. >> for what, the fiscal cliff or the fiscal abyss? >> for both. >> for both. >> so that a down
the company's economy. the damage from sandy was worse than first anticipated. there's 75,000 jobs lost in new jersey and new york. and the $1.4 billion economy is -- in the quarters ahead, in the fourth quart, he sees a quarter to a half point hit to national gdp directly related to the effects of sandy. talking about the national economy, the bright spots include housing and consumer spending, the negatives include business investment along with weak manufacturing. the congress and the administration must address the fiscal cliff. any plan to reduce the deficit should quote start small and then grow very substantially over time. so dudley basically agreeing with the take that sandy is a bigger event, and then you want to add on top of that dudley's concerns about the fiscal cliff coming our way. >> what does this mean for the retailers because right now we have the impact of sandy, because they're confined pretty much to november. we had this seasonally strong period for retail sales especially for the holiday season. but does that mean the kruk -- money is being spent instead on gypsum boar
of an agreement that's good for the economy is if a group of republicans decide they're going to block and increase in tax rates on the wealthiest americans. i think it's unlikely they will choose to do, that of course, because there's so much at stake. >> schieffer: in all seriousness, i'm told mitch mcconnell laughed when you handed in this proposal. is that true? >> they're in a hard position, bob. they really are in a difficult position. and they're going to have to figure out their politics of what they do next and they're trying to figure that out right now. we're going to work very hard at this and we're going to keep talking to each other. and, again, i think we have a very good chance for coming together on an agreement that not just protects 98% of americans from a tax increase and protects the economy from deeply damaging upfront spending cuts and protects the med from leaving us vulnerable to, you know, periodic threats of defaults by politicians, i think we can do better than that and do something good for the long-term future of the american economy. >> schieffer: did you
have to put the changes that happened well down the road because the economy's not ready to handle a lot of these changes in terms of cuts and things like that. but the idea that it feels like they're not going to do anything. you could wand ind up with the situation, let it all ride. we won't deal with any of it right now. >> republicans have had a good pint that tax increases are immediate and spending cuts are put off. >> when is a good time? they're talking about another four or five years of we're not going to be ready to have any type of austerity because it's still this huge debt overhang. what color is that tie? >> i don't know. red, i think. >> is it a red rutgers tie? >> not intentional. i completely forgot about the game. not having paid attention to the most important sports event of the year. >> they lost. but they played well. >> they showed up. i didn't see it, but i was happy they showed up. i have my rise above button back on because i thought i was going to have a rutgers button so which would not have allowed me to -- but now i had room for this. you got no sleep
office, bowles has a good reason for saying what he did. the economy would go into a recession, economic output would drop and unemployment rate would go back up to 9.1% by the end of next year. now, the clock is ticking. john and harry, get out of the sand box. 33 days are left. peter difazio of oregon is "outfront" tonight. let me just get a response from you about timothy geithner's plan that he put on the table. 1.6 trillion in revenue. $400 billion in cuts. i'm a little confused because the president said he will give $2.50 in spending cuts for every dollar in revenue. this is, this is the opposite. >> well, finally, the white house has learned not to negotiate with itself, but with the opposition, which is the republicans. remember, there is no real cliff. on january 1st, the only thing that goes away is the social security tax holiday and nobody is seriously talking about continuing that. all the other tax increases don't take place until sometime around march. gives congress plenty of time to rekrit them, but that's $4 trillion of additional revenues. so okay, we're going to cut
, that is good news, you saw growth in economy and in the last few moments we moved higher and we are positive for the week. when you check it out and industrials we are up 44 points and most of those names on the dow are in the green, names like hewlett-packard and caterpillar and bank of america and united healthcare doing well. the fiscal cliff headline after headline continues to be in the forefront and on everybody's mind that this is what we are seeing, a decent market and the u.s. dollar being weaker today has been a factor in the strength we are seeing as well. connell: treasury secretary tim geithner meeting with congressional leaders and doing so as we speak. dagen: peter barnes live from capitol hill. peter: treasury secretary tim geithner arriving at our or so ago to hold meetings with top congressional leaders. senate democratic leader harry reid, now he is meeting with house speaker john boehner, that meeting just getting underway, after that meeting with senate republican leader mitch mcconnell and house democratic leader nancy pelosi and with the president and republicans on ra
that this is a self-inflicted wound on our economy, you're exactly right, our current policy. we're educating brilliant students and then compelling them to go to work in shanghai or singapore rather than san antonio or the silicon valley. meanwhile, we're handing out tens of thousands of diversity visas to immigrants chosen by a random lottery, without regard to any qualifications they might when it comes to job creation and entrepreneurship. it makes absolutely no sense. i believe we need an immigration policy that serves our national interest. and if there's one thing that we need more than anything else now is we need job creators and entrepreneurs in the united states. and we know in the -- in the global economy, it's people with the special skills in science, technology, engineering and mathematics are the ones that are going to help us create jobs and grow the economy. not just for these individuals, but for the people that are hired by the start-up businesses that they will create. the stem jobs act would mitigate the problem with the diversity lottery visa which, again, does not dist
where substantively republicans believe in things and think certain things are better for the economy and the country, they will be in a weaker position to achieve any of those things. but they have to take into the consideration the idea that everybody's taxes will go up january 1st if there is no deal. it is not going to be all on the president's shoulders. in fact most of might be on theirs temporarily and for good. they have to decide what is the better position. and you know, will the president and the democrats offer them something that they really should take, significant spending cuts? some kind of significant entitlement reform? those are kind of things republicans have been after for a long time. even though there would be grumbling about tax increases on certain income level, that is something they could take home and really savor. this depends where it goes, the brinkmanship continues. david drucker from "roll call." thank you. >> thanks a lot. jenna: well now we turnover seas where we have some new information today on what some say could really be a turning point in the
. if you believe that? >> it's hard to imagine that the president would want to send the economy into another recession. that would be a terrible start to his second term and it would cripple the rest of the spectrum. everything else that he would want to do. it would seem a bit suicidal to do that. that being said, there is a scenario where he thinks that he might be able to quickly turn around and get tax cuts back in place. it depends on how much you think going over the fiscal cliff will affect the economy. others say it will be devastating and others say it will be back. it depends on where you stand when you are making these sort of analyses. megyn: it feels like we are left with the economy -- with people's livelihoods and growth in the country and salaries and unemployment benefits. we are just left. both sides are accusing the other of being the untethered risk taker. last night speaker boehner made remarks demanding leadership on the president. here he is. >> this is not a game. jobs are on the line. the american economy is on the line. this is a moment for adults leade
it differently, they should tell us how they want to do it. >> i believe raising tax rates hurts our economy, hurts the prospects for more jobs in our country. >> shannon: as the sparring continues over the fiscal cliff, neither boehner nor geithner can say for certain that the country will not go over the edge. i'm shannon bream. america's news headquarters live from the nation's capital starts right now. >> shannon: we want to get to the budget standoff. peter doocy joins us live. there is time to strike a deal but not a lot. >> reporter: that's right. the speaker of the house john boehner made a point today to say there is not much time between election day and the end of the year. he thinks the white house has already wasted weeks because he does not think the proposal to avoid a fiscal cliff is serious one. negotiations here are nowhere. another republican, senator lindsey graham thinks he thinks things are heading down hill. >> i think we are going over the cliff. it's clear to me they made a political calculation. the offer doesn't deal with the entitlement reform to save the medicare
the world as a very effective way of ensuring a decarbonization market driven way of our economy, and we've just published an energy bill and to let the control framework that would allow for new renewable investment to the rest of this decade. the industry has that, alongside the cast strategy. on the decarbonization target, as they say we're going to take a power in the bill to set a target but that would be a decision for after the next carbon budget which happens in 2016. that is a perfectly sensible and rational approach to take. >> cannot congratulate the chancellor on his statement that fair, transparent -- [shouting] >> is not only not rising but is falling in every year of this parliament? with 19 days to christmas, mr. speaker, can ask the chancellor which the family-friendly measures whether scrapping the fuel duty increase, freezing tax are raising the personal allowance next year he thinks will be most benefit for the family? >> what i would say to my honorable friend is with have to take some difficult decisions. we've had to take difficult decisions on welfare of bring alo
hikes and spending cuts, we are getting a new snapshot of our economy. the number of americans seeking unemployment benefits fell last week by 23,000, but the total, 393,000, is still way above where we need to be to bring the unemployment rate down. in fact, our four week unemployment average went up to over 405,000 last week. the report for the whole month is out a week from tomorrow. >>> meantime, a new report finds that the number of americans on food stamps spiked by about 10% last year. that means about 15 million american households got food stamps in 2011, and it is even more profound when you look at what america has and has not created over the past decade. look at this chart. private employment is the line at the very bottom. it's gone down. this is going all the way back to 2002, i think it is? yeah, so look at this. you can see there starts to be a dramatic change around '08, '09. so private employment down, government employment slightly up, medicaid enrollment has soared -- that's what you get that helps folks without a lot of means -- and look at the top line. that repr
billion slashed from domestic programs. an estimated 2 million jobs could be lost pushing the economy back into a recession adding to the misery to those facing tough times by ending jobless benefits for the long term unemployed. steve is live in washington. where do we stand at this point? >> reporter: two sides did do something today. they appeared on the sunday talk shows but they haven't negotiated an actual deal. john boehner blasted the white house plan which was put forward last week. boehner says the president essentially wasted the last three weeks since the election with nonsense. >> the president is asking for $1.6 trillion worth of new revenue over ten years, twice as much as he been asking for in public. stimulus spending that exceeded the amount of new cuts he was willing to consider. it was not a serious offer. >> reporter: and boehner says he was flabbergasted when he was given the proposal. >> heather: and democrats are defending themselves? >> treasury-secretary tim geithner on fox news defending the president's plan for raising revenues, cutting spending and reduce the d
markets and our economy. based on what we are reporting tonight, the demeanor of this president, the insult, there is no other way that i can think of to construe what timothy geithner carried over to speaker boehner today. i don't know why he bothered to make the trip. that was an insult. the markets tonight and tomorrow and i'm talking about asia and europe, they are going to be extremely volatile in reaction. do you not agree? >> i agree with you and i think the markets were watching us. individuals were watching us. this is real drama, it is serious. saturday is december 1. we coullget a substantial del and we could lower people's rates and bring in revenue. but we couldhave an economy with a lot of vitality to create jobs. or we could go into contraction. lou: senator richard shelby, thank you so much. much more on these negotiations over what would be tax hikes and $1.2 trillion on the first of january. we will be talking with congressman devin nunes of california. >> big-money donors visiting the white house. does the president really want the ceos advice? things are gett
beyond that's going to be good for the long term american economy. >> but you said you're getting closer, they're saying you're getting much farther apart. they say that this is not a serious proposal. >> we have a very good plan. we have a very good mix of tax reforms that raise a modest amount of revenues on the wealthy 2% of americans. combined with very comprehensive, very detailed savings that get us back to the point where the debt is stable and favorable. if we can do that carefully, we can invest in things to make america stronger. we can rebuild infrastructure. we think those are good investments in america and we think we can afford them. >> let's look at an outline of what republicans said they heard in the meeting. $1.6 trillion in tax increases over the next ten years. $50 billion in stimulus spending right now. $400 billion in unspecified medicare cuts. over the next ten years. and then, permanent authority to increase the debt limit the president wants that authority. they look at that 1.6 trillion in revenue and say it's twice as much you get from raising taxes on the wea
's not a threat. she said, listen, these are the facts. >> nice little economy you have there. nice little economy you have there. it would be a shame it if anything happened to it. that's not a threat. look, we have to start looking at what happens if we do, in fact, go over the so-called cliff, and what happens is, you know, one thing is we take a huge bite out of the deficit. we do it in a crude may, and there would be immediate attempts to fix it and fine-tune it and take some back. some would probably get through. if you actually want to look at it from a policy standpoint, it may not be the worst possible option to just go over the cliff and then put back in the tax cuts and the spending increases or renewals that you'd like to put back in. so, you know, worst things could happen. >> well, listen, alan simpson and i go back to his sound from the "today" show, eugene. he said anyone talking about it in that way, there's stupidity involved. he didn't say, eugene, you better not because you're my buddy, but the reality is even our first read team says this notion or all of this media hype about
. we're going to talk about the fiscal cliff. if we go over it, will it really destroy the u.s. economy? we'll show you some stats to make you go -- hmm. we'll talk more about apple's slide, should microsoft's ceo steve ballmer get the boot if the surface fails. and we will introduce to you quite possibly the world's dumbest demolition crew. it involves a multi-million dollar bore chateau and really bad bulldozing. >> yikes. see you at 1:00, brian. thank you. >>> listen up wall street recruiters, a recent rash of college cheating scandals has shown academic dishonesty is unfortunately a very big problem on campus today. who are the worst offenders? tonight's premier of "faking the grade -- classroom cheaters," we'll tell you. they'll find out which students are most likely to cut corners in the battle to gain an edge. >> reporter: don mccabe and his canadian colleague collaborate on research. mccabe says in the u.s. business students cheat the most. engineering students are often near the top of the list. and so are communications and journalism students. women studied at one university
can i do? if they say, what do you think? i say, low income rates, economy recovering slowly, housing coming back, if you stay through the turmoil, you'll have higher markets after its over, and maybe much higher so my view is yoo stay invested, broadly diversified, etfs to do it. >> you had me until much higher markets on the other side. what makes you think that? as an investor, it it's a higher tax, straightforward math. if you raise tax on dividends and capital gains, makes stocks less valuable in the long run, a less appetizing choice. you mentioned housing on the way back. holding assets for a long time, buy housing, gold stocks, something to sit? >> well, you have a diversify, and stocks are under owned, one. the monetary policy is predictable for years, and it's a low, low interest rate so now you say what are the relative choices? go by a high grade tax free bond, 3% interest. i can buy stocks, a 2%-plus dividend, could tax higher, but the dividends rise. i can get into a market cheaply if i believe earnings grow over time, say, the rest of the decade. that's my time horizon.
we can continue to develop policies to grow our economy through international trade and hopefully help advance the rule of law around the world. this is a good package that deserves our strong support. i urge -- i urge all of my colleagues to join in supporting this bill. i believe that we have got to do more in the international trade world. earlier, due to the efforts of the distinguished chairman, senator baucus and his staff and my staff, we were able to get the korean, colombian and panamanian treaties through. these were steps in the right direction after all these years. to have this happen is going to be a wonderful thing i think for our country and really for russia itself, and it certainly is going to help us go down the line in doing what's best for our own trade. one of the other special things that's in this is it's going to cause russia to have to live up to some international trade and international intellectual property laws, international laws, and we in this country believe in obeying those laws, and i have to say russia, india and china have invaded intellectual
with sending the economy over the fiscal cliff. >> the speaker's remarks riled the left and provoked this response from senate majority leader harry reid. >> he says that democrats have got to get serious about cuts, spending cuts. where is the disconnect, then? >> i don't understand his brain, so you should ask him. okay? >> with only a handful of legislative days left on the congress's calendar before the looming fiscal cliff becomes a raw reality, will the president and house gop find a way over the latest road black and back to the bargaining table? >> why did the white house decide to have this as their opening volley when they knew the response would be a negative one that they drew? >> was it hardball opening? yeah, of course it was. the question is, what's the counteroffer? >> i would imagine there has to -- tim geithner is too smart of a guy in this administration is filled with smart people. they must have a serious strategic plan. >> let's get straight into this and joining me now is senator barbara boxer, democrat from california. senator, it is great to have you with me
and is fair. that would be good for businesses, for our economy, for future generations. i believe both parties can and will work together in the coming weeks to get that done. we know how that gets done. we're iffing to have to raise a little more revenue. we got to cut on the spending we don't need, building on the trillion dollars of spending cuts we've already made, and if we combine those two things, we can create a path where america is paying its bills while still being able to make investments and the things we need to grow like education and infrastructure. so we know how to do that, but in washington nothing is easy, so, you know, there's going to be some prolonged negotiations, and all of us are going to have to get out of our comfort zones to make that happen. i'm willing to do that. i'm hopeful that the members of congress in both parties are willing to do that as well. we can solve these problems. but where the clock is really ticking right now is on middle class taxes. at the end of the year middle class taxes that are currently in place are set to expire. middle class ta
for the economy. if they have different suggestions they want to go further in some areas, then they should lay odds with us. >> reporter: secretary geithner said he cannot promise we will not go over the fiscal cliff and whether or not we go over it depends -- is a decision, rather, that lay in the hands of republicans that don't want to increase tax rates. speaker boehner said there is a chance we go over the cliff, but he doesn't want any part of that and he will do everything he can to avert that. eric, jamie? >> eric: peter, negotiations if and when they commence and continue, we'll see what happens. thank you, peter. jamie? >> jamie: well, you will also want -- we're going to talk, actually, to chris wallace and get a preview about that interview. hard to believe he has both tim geithner and john boehner. from the looks of it, john boehner does seem to be flabbergasted. we'll get to that shortly. >> eric: that is on "fox news sunday." later today, exclusive interview with speaker boehner. sunday at 2:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m. right here on the fox news channel. >> jamie: well, there is a push
and bigger government regardless of the impact on jobs and economy and america's standing in the world. >> gretchen: who could the fiscal cliff jumpers be. matt is editor in chief of the washington weekend. he's my guest. good morning. >> good morning. >> gretchen: who wants to go off of the cliff and die. >> buckle your seat. important senator is patti murray in charge of the democrat campaign committee. she got put in the position thinking it was not a good year for democrats and she turned into one. that gave her clout in the democratic caucus. when she gave a speech saying we could make a more liberal deal if we go off the cliff democrats started listening. >> gretchen: senator harry reid want to go off the cliff. >> he's playing the double game. he want to look like a deal make yer support the president. but so many democrats have a strange idea of compromise. it is all right. give me everything and i will do nothing. what we are seeing from the democrats, republicans you cave on taxs and revenue and we'll not cut entitlements at all. that is not a good deal and suggests that more
to the federal government without raising tax rates which we believe am harm our economy. >> one conservative in the senate is breaking ranks with his party over the whole idea of raising tax rates with the party. tom coburn told msnbc today he would be okay with doing what the president wants, raising taxes on the wealthy, as long as it is coupled with entitlement reform and spending cuts. the reason we're told is because he believes at this point it's better to do that to get what he and other republicans want long term, which is a fundamental overhaul of the tax code, perhaps they can get that if they give the president what he wants now. you remember, coburn was among the first republicans a couple years ago to say it was okay to raise revenue. now he appears to be the first senate republican to say he would be okay with raising rates as long as it's part of that package we described. >> a meeting or a phone call between john boehner and president obama, is that at all in the works? >> as far as we know, no. whether it's in the works, we could only hope, at this point we do not have any i
on with speaker boehner? he went off his own cliff today. we'll tell you why he's ready to hold the economy hostage again. >>> and what's really behind john mccain's relentless and baseless attack on susan rice? former governor of new mexico and ambassador to the u.n., bill richardson, joins us live. >>> plus, remember this guy with the romney tattoo? he might just be the smartest man in the republican party today. >>> and we'll tell you what joe biden bought at costco today. you'll love this video. you're watching "politicsnation" on msnbc. >>> this is interesting. president obama is going to have lunch with mitt romney and you thought you had an awkward meal with your family on thanks giving. what i don't get is he said nobody should get a free lunch and now he's going to the white house to have a free lunch. [ male announcer ] with 160 more miles per tank, the distances aren't getting shorter. ♪ the trucks are going farther. the new 2013 ram 1500. ♪ with the best-in-class fuel economy. engineered to move heaven and earth. ♪ guts. glory. ram. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] while you're
of not getting a deal on time and the effect that will have on the economy. >> we absolutely want to avoid going over the fiscal cliff because it would be a big drag on the economy. >> but are you willing to do that? >> what we're willing to do is come up with a package that both accelerates economic recovery, but also begins to reduce the long term deficit and the president's been very clear that that means asking higher income earn eaers to pay who are. more. so the real question is whether republicans will agree with tom cole who the other day said we should agree with the president. so let's get that done. let's not hold the middle class hostage to getting a bonus tax break for folks at the top. so it was great to hear tom come forward on that. obviously he's taken some heat within his caucus, but that would obviously avoid the fiscal cliff. >> congressman chriss van hollen, thanks so much. appreciate it. >>> so he mentioned tom cole. let me play what he had to say. >> the president is willing to accept 80% of the bush tax cuts for 9d 8% of the american peopl and make them permanent, we shou
fantasy. it is real. and will bring the economy to its knees at last temporarily if they don't fix that. you talk to economists on the left, on the right, they would really have agreement. you don't think it is serious? >> cbo said if we go over the fiscal cliff unemployment would be over 9%. if we go over it, it is still going to be over 9%. if we stop, it will be close to 9% only half a point difference which is a lot, i'm not minimizing it. >> it has to do with what the trajectory of growth is in the economy which is critical. the other element here, you're talking about what the republicans should do, gingrich is talking about what the republicans should do. i think they need to come forward with a reasonable proposal, and say look this is what we want. paul ryan who said, the real problem in all of this, yeah taxes, they are going to be disputes about how you get revenue. the real problem is runaway entitlement spending. >> sean: absolutely. >> it is the big elephant in every room. and the republicans say let's do something about it when i talked to obama in july he said, "it is an
and that is a game leapfrog. we end up with more debt and a weaker economy. the road map is greece, italy, spain, all over europe but the president thinks you can tax-and-spend your way to prosperity. >>neil: what the administration throws back on the issue is take a look at italy and greece, austerity has worked. you say what? >>guest: they have a strange definition. alwaysst either to them means higher taxes in europe and the united states austerity means less spending. i am in favor of the right definition of austerity. the balkan countries got out of the mess and now they are doing well economically because they cut, not just cut spending in the washington sense of increasing it at a slower rate they spent less one year after the other and now they are out of the trouble. if you understand the right definition of austerity is the way to go, the problem is in most of europe it means higher taxes, obama wants to give us the bad part of europe, without the good part. >>neil: thank you very much. they are not cutting anything. just slowing the growth. rebound and former president bill clinton hitting
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